About "History"

From Canada’s early First Nations and Inuit cultures to European exploration, Confederation, women’s suffrage, wartime and beyond.

Portion of Paolo Forlani's 1560 map of the world showing "Canada" for the first time
Map: Paolo Forlani, courtesy Library and Archives Canada
In 1560, Italian map engraver Paolo Forlani became the first to include "Canada" on a printed map
1916 letter from George Cantlie to daughter Celia Cantlie with pressed flowers
Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic
War Flowers, a new exhibition on now at the Canadian War Museum, tells the stories of Canadians in the First World War through floriography, sculpture, scent and sound
George Hunter, photographer
Photo courtesy Firefly Books, Canadian Heritage Photography Foundation
George Hunter made it his lifelong mission to show Canadians their country. Now, his iconic images have been compiled into a book. 
Adam Shoalts A history of Canada in 10 maps
Illustration: Robert Carter; cover image courtesy Allen Lane
In A History of Canada in 10 Maps: Epic Stories of Charting a Mysterious Land, Adam Shoalts delves into the fascinating stories behind the people and maps that helped shape a nation  
Cover image from The Raftsmen, Firefly Books 2017
Illustration: Dmitry Bondarenko, courtesy Firefly Books
The Raftsmen tells the remarkable (and once nearly forgotten) story of how four French expats living in Canada became the first to cross the North Atlantic by raft 
Although often unheralded in accounts of Champlain's accomplishments, Indigenous Peoples played an important role in helping the famous explorer map New France
Dead Reckoning by Ken McGoogan cover woodcut Ebierbing
Images courtesy HarperCollins
Author Ken McGoogan says his latest book, Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage, is the "more inclusive narrative of Arctic exploration" that the 21st century demands 
Central Esker, northwestern Manitoba
Photo: Aaron Kylie/Canadian Geographic
The geological formations that surround Gangler's North Seal River Lodge in northwestern Manitoba are intriguing pathways to the past
Thou Shalt do no Murder, Minik, The New York Eskimo, Kenn Harper
Images courtesy Nunavut Arctic College Media, Steerforth Press
In his new book, Thou Shalt Do No Murder, historian Kenn Harper explores how the killing of a trader in 1920 set off a clash of cultures in the Canadian High Arctic that still resonates today
Ry Moran at 50 Sussex Drive
Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic
The director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation reflects on Indigenous progress in 2017 and looks ahead to 2067
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